Friday, 17 November 2017

Fatal accident in Menallen Township

Fatal accident in Menallen Township

Fatal accident in Menallen Township

Fatal accident in Menallen Township (November 15, 2017) There was a fatal accident in Menallen Township leaving one elderly man dead and his wife injured.

The Herald Standard reported the accident happened on November 15th after 1 o’clock in the afternoon involving a Chevy Blazer sport utility vehicle and a small car.  The vehicles hit head-on while driving on New Salem Road.  The small car was driven by an elderly couple and the elder gentleman died in the accident.  His wife was injured in the accident but the extent of her injuries has not been disclosed.

Police are investigating the cause of the accident and no names of those involved have not been disclosed.

If you or a loved one has been involved in an auto accident, you have our deepest sympathy.  Let us help you with the concerns you are certain to have and assist you by ensuring your rights are fully protected.  Please contact us at Edelstein, Martin & Nelson so that we can help you navigate through this difficult time.

Edelstein Martin & Nelson makes every effort to ensure that the accident news that we report about Pennsylvania accidents is correct and accurate however we cannot guarantee that every detail is complete or accurate.  Our information is gathered by secondary sources.  If anything is inaccurate or incorrect, we will make every effort to correct the information as soon as we are notified.

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Trump added 5 names to his list of potential Supreme Court nominees

supreme court

  • President Donald Trump has added five people to his shortlist of possible Supreme Court picks.
  • It's unclear whether any vacancies on the nine-justice court are looming, but rumors have been swirling in recent months that Justice Anthony Kennedy wants to retire.


President Donald Trump has added five names to his list of prospective Supreme Court nominees, the White House announced on Friday.

Trump's original list was released in September 2016 before he was elected president, and included then-Colorado federal appeals court Judge Neil Gorsuch, who now sits on the Supreme Court in the seat left vacant by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

"President Trump will choose a nominee for a future Supreme Court vacancy, should one arise," the White House said in a statement announcing the list. "The President remains deeply committed to identifying and selecting outstanding jurists in the mold of Justice Gorsuch."

The additions to Trump's list are made of up three federal appeals court judges and two state Supreme Court justices. Two of the additions are women.

The new additions to the list include:

  • Amy Coney Barrett, a judge on the US Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit
  • Britt Grant, a Georgia state Supreme Court justice
  • Brett Kavanaugh, a judge on the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit
  • Kevin Newsom, a judge on the US Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit
  • Patrick Wyrick, an Oklahoma state Supreme Court justice

It's unclear whether any Supreme Court vacancies are looming — rumors began swirling last spring that Justice Anthony Kennedy intended to retire at the end of the term but were shut down several months later.

Last month, Trump reportedly told multiple people in private he believed he would be able to fill three more Supreme Court seats — those of Kennedy, as well as Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor. According to Axios, Trump cited the 84-year-old Ginsburg's age and Sotomayor's health — she has Type 1 diabetes — as reasons he believed their seats would soon be vacant.

SEE ALSO: Trump is reportedly talking about Supreme Court justices' health issues, privately predicting he'll be able to appoint 4

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Trump says the Texas church shooting 'isn't a guns situation' — watch his full statement on the attack that killed 26 people


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Gun owners are getting around legal restrictions by making their own 'ghost guns'

gun show

  • The gunman who killed five people in Northern California this week used what's called a 'ghost gun,' which he build at home.
  • Ghost guns, which are unlicensed and unregistered, are becoming increasingly widespread as more criminals try to get around government tracking and regulation.
  • Law enforcement is growing more concerned about these firearms.


The gunman who killed his wife and four others in Northern California earlier this week is part of a growing trend of gun owners making their own firearms without serial numbers, known as "ghost guns."

"Most of the people doing this are legitimate gun owners doing it as a hobby," Rick Vasquez, an ATF technical expert, told NBC News. "But as with any type of device, they also can be used in a criminal activity by bad actors who are looking for ways to acquire firearms without any traceability. It's past the point of no return."

Kevin Neal, who has been identified as the shooter, possessed two high-powered rifles that he made himself at home. He used these so-called "ghost guns" — named for law enforcement's inability to trace these guns since they do not include serial or registration numbers — to carry out his attack.

A court order in California previously blocked Neal from buying guns because of his criminal history, which included stabbing his neighbor and recklessly shooting hundreds of rounds of ammunition on his property.

While ghost guns have already been on the market for years, the Associated Press reports that they are increasingly showing up at crime scenes, although the fact that these guns can't be traced makes it difficult for law enforcement to estimate how many are actually circulating on the streets.

Reselling homemade guns is prohibited, but making them is completely legal. Neal bought the parts for the gun separately and assembled them at home, NBC News reports.

Prospective gun owners who want an untraceable firearm typically buy what is called an 80% receiver, or an unfinished gun that the ATF does not consider an actual firearm for the purposes of regulation.

kevin neal california gunman

In just a few hours, the 80% receiver can be converted into a fully functioning semi-automatic rifle or handgun simply by drilling holes into the lower receiver — the gun's core — and adding a few extra parts.

Advancements in technology have made the gun-making process even easier. From 3-D printing to computer-controlled milling, people now have "the ability to make lethal weapons at home with no regulation whatsoever," according to Wired.

This makes it easy for criminals like Neal to bypass court orders and other restrictions on gun ownership. It also makes it more difficult for the police or the government to investigate crimes involving firearms.

"The unfinished receiver is a total workaround because the prohibited person doesn't have to provide any identification," Paul Ware, an ATF lawyer, told the AP. "You just get it delivered to your home, and you build the exact same gun you could have bought at the store."

Ghost gun manufacturers, however, do not shy away from the controversy.

"Americans have been building their own unserialized and unregistered weapons since the foundation of our nation," one manufacturer says on its website. "Building your own AR15 rifle from an 80% lower receiver is a practice that stems from the 2nd Amendment of our constitution, and doing so without government involvement is the idea behind 'shall no be infringed.'"

SEE ALSO: Putting an elementary school on lockdown may have kept the California gunman from killing dozens of children

SEE ALSO: 6 barely legal gun products that are still widely available

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: The US Air Force can create ice storms and sandstorms inside this 'torture chamber' for aircraft


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The US recorded civilians as ISIS members in what may be 'the least transparent war in recent American history'

us military helicopter

  • The US military has drastically underreported the number of civilian casualties in its fight against ISIS.
  • A recent investigation found the rate of civilian deaths in Iraq to be 31 times higher than what has been reported by US-led coalition forces.
  • News of underreported civilian casualties comes as President Donald Trump loosens rules of engagement abroad, which many human rights organizations say will lead to more innocent lives lost.


An 18-month investigation by The New York Times revealed that the US-led coalition fighting ISIS repeatedly recorded civilian deaths as enemy casualties.

The Times' journalists scanned the locations of nearly 150 coalition airstrikes across northern Iraq and found the rate of civilian deaths to be more than 31 times that acknowledged by the coalition.

Such negligence — a combination of simply flawed and outdated intelligence — amounted to what the Times noted "may be the least transparent war in recent American history."

Maj. Shane Huff, a spokesman for the Department of Defense agency overseeing the US-led coalition, said "US and coalition forces work very hard to be precise in airstrikes." He told the Times that the US has been "conducting one of the most precise air campaigns in military history."

The reality on the ground reportedly tells a much different story.

Data from coalition forces reported Iraqi civilian deaths have resulted in about one of every 157 airstrikes. The Times found that civilians were killed in one out of every five.

Basim Razzo was almost one of the victims, according to the Times. In September 2015, Razzo was sleeping in his bed in Mosul — then under ISIS control — when a US coalition airstrike reduced much of his home to a heap of rubble. He awoke drenched in blood. The roof of his house had been torn apart. Worst of all, he didn't know if his family had been hurt. He soon discovered his wife, daughter, brother, and nephew had been killed.

Later that day, the US coalition uploaded a video to YouTube entitled, "Coalition Airstrike Destroys Daesh VBIED Facility Near Mosul Iraq 20 Sept 2015." The military claimed it had successfully demolished an ISIS car-bomb factory, but it now appears they actually struck the homes of Razzo and his brother, killing four innocent civilians in the process.

Human rights concerns

us military iraq

In July, the Iraqi Army liberated Mosul from ISIS forces, but people like Razzo couldn't move on. Many still live with the fear of being misidentified as ISIS sympathizers, and the tragedy of losing innocent loved ones.

"We're not happy with it, and we're never going to be happy with it," Col. John Thomas, a spokesman for the Central Command, told the Times regarding civilian casualties. "But we're pretty confident we do the best we can to try to limit these things."

That's not enough for human rights organizations, who often criticize coalition forces for poor reporting procedures that leave dozens, sometimes hundreds or even thousands of dead civilians unaccounted for. Human Rights Watch also called on President Donald Trump to do more to protect civilians abroad as news surfaced that he was modifying US military rules of engagement with suspected terrorists.

"Trump's reported changes for targeting terrorism suspects will result in more civilian deaths with less oversight and greater secrecy," Letta Tayler, a HRW researcher, said earlier this month. "The US should be increasing civilian protections off the battlefield, not dismantling them."

SEE ALSO: Here's how the US-led coalition decides when and where to hit ISIS targets in Iraq

DON'T MISS: ISIS' loss of its caliphate signals the end of one type of ISIS — and the beginning of a new one

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: What El Chapo is really like — according to the wife of one his closest henchman


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Jay-Z blasts the 'absurdity' of Meek Mill's controversial prison sentence and the criminal justice system in NYT op-ed

jay z meek mill

  • Jay-Z wrote a New York Times op-ed on Friday protesting rapper Meek Mill's controversial prison sentence from last week.
  • Jay-Z has been one of Mill's most fervent supporters, previously calling the ruling "unjust and heavy-handed."
  • In the Times op-ed, Jay-Z calls probation "a trap" and highlights "the absurdity of the criminal justice system."

 

When rapper Meek Mill was sentenced to 2-4 years in prison last week for violating his probation, an outpouring of protest followed the controversial decision, with Jay-Z being one of Mill's most fervent supporters.

After calling Mill's sentence "unjust and heavy-handed" in a Facebook post last week, Jay-Z wrote an op-ed protesting Mill's sentence and the "absurdity of the criminal justice system" for The New York Times on Friday.

"What's happening to Meek Mill is just one example of how our criminal justice system entraps and harasses hundreds of thousands of black people every day," Jay-Z wrote. "I saw this up close when I was growing up in Brooklyn during the 1970s and 1980s. Instead of a second chance, probation ends up being a land mine, with a random misstep bringing consequences greater than the crime."

Mill was imprisoned last week following a sentencing from a Philadelphia judge, who Mill's attorney said showed an inappropriate "personal bias" in a "ridiculous" decision that the rapper's legal team is currently appealing. 

In his Times op-ed, Jay-Z addresses how the two charges that violated Mill's probation were both either dropped or dismissed, and that neither Mill's probation officer nor the case prosecutor recommended that Mill be imprisoned. 

He went on to use the specifics of Mill's case to paint a picture of injustice in the criminal justice system at large, including how black people are disproportionately imprisoned for probation or parole violations. 

"Probation is a trap and we must fight for Meek and everyone else unjustly sent to prison," he wrote.

Read Jay-Z's op-ed in The New York Times.

SEE ALSO: Rapper Meek Mill's attorney says judge's 'personal bias' led to a 'ridiculous' 2-4 year prison sentence

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: These realistic animations will mess with your mind


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Thursday, 16 November 2017

Stewartstown Collision Kills a Man and Injures One Woman

Stewartstown Collision Kills a Man and Injures One Woman

Stewartstown Collision Kills a Man and Injures One Woman

Stewartstown Collision Kills a Man and Injures One Woman (October 24, 2017) A two car accident has caused tragedy for two Pennsylvania families as a Stewartstown collision kills a man and injures one woman.

A report from EIN NewsDesk indicated that police on the scene did not yet have much in the way of details but were able to determine that the collision was head-on and both drivers were reported to be injured at the scene.  A vehicle driven by Forest See, 76 years old from Shrewsbury is believed to have left his lane on Orwig Road, traveled directly into oncoming traffic where his vehicle struck the vehicle of woman, who’s name has not been released.  She is reported to be 75 years old.

Both Mr. See and the woman were transported to York Hospital where Mr. See was pronounced dead.  The woman remains under hospital care with injuries described as serious.

Police are continuing the study the accident and no cause or responsibility has yet been determined.

If you or a loved one has been involved in an auto accident, you have our deepest sympathy.  Let us help you with the concerns you are certain to have and assist you by ensuring your rights are fully protected.  Please contact us at Edelstein, Martin & Nelson so that we can help you navigate through this difficult time.

Edelstein Martin & Nelson makes every effort to ensure that the accident news that we report about Pennsylvania accidents is correct and accurate however we cannot guarantee that every detail is complete or accurate.  Our information is gathered by secondary sources.  If anything is inaccurate or incorrect, we will make every effort to correct the information as soon as we are notified.

The post Stewartstown Collision Kills a Man and Injures One Woman appeared first on Personal Injury Attorney Philadelphia.


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This is what it's like to be a 'Dreamer' working at IBM and fighting to keep from being deported (IBM)

Alan Torres

  • IBM brought some of the so-called Dreamers that work for the company to Washington DC.
  • Dreamers are children who were brought to the US illegally with their parents, and who now have jobs and roots in the country.
  • IBM is fighting to ensure the 30 Dreamers it employs are not deported as Congress revisits immigration laws.


Alan Torres is a "dreamer," meaning his parents brought him to the US illegally when he was a kid, he grew up not knowing he wasn't a legal resident and he loves the US as his home country. 

Since the Trump Administration announced that it was ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), his future hangs over a canyon on uncertainty. DACA is an Obama-era program that exempted dreamers from deportation for two-year periods, and allowed them to get work permits, as long as they stay out of trouble. A bi-partisan bill called the Dream Act that would give people like Torres a path to permanent residency. That's why people like Torres are called "dreamers."

Today, Torres is a software quality assurance engineer at IBM, one of 30 dreamers that IBM employs. IBM is one of a number of tech companies fighting vigorously to keep dreamers from being deported. President Donald Trump wants Congress to deal with dreamers by passing legislation. But with the current state of dysfunction in Washington, that's easier said than done.

Trump gave Congress six months to figure it out. After that, if Trump doesn't alter course, Dreamers will not be spared from deportation. Currently, no new dreamers are being accepted into the DACA program, but those that have DACA status can continue in their lives until that status runs out.

Torres, 31, agreed to speak to Business Insider about what life is like for him as Dreamer tech worker — his story is both heartbreaking and hopeful.

From his point of view: Imagine being forced to leave a job you love, a home you own, and the country where you grew up because of something your parents did when you were just a kid.

From ROTC to IBM

"It was 1999 when I first came to America. I was 13 years old. We came to Dallas and that’s where I’ve always lived. As  a kid, I was unaware of my situation," he says. 

"I remember when 9/11 happened. I was sitting in school. I was in the ROTC program and I remember I was wearing the uniform, and I felt as American as apple pie. I remember sitting there and crying with the rest of my class. I think I was 15 or 16 at the time, and I looking around and thinking, 'I can’t believe this happened to my nation,'" he says.

Alan TorrezIt wasn't until Torres tried to apply for his driver's permit, which required a social security number that he didn't have, that he started to realize that something was different about his situation. He asked around about how to get this number and that's how he learned that, not only wasn't he not a citizen, he wasn't even a legal resident.

Torres was a good student who had been taking advanced placement classes and his teachers encouraged him to apply for college. That too, felt impossible without a social security number.

"I graduated from high school and felt doors closing in on me. I had dreams and aspirations. I wanted to go into biomedical engineering," he said.

Instead, he got a job in the restaurant industry. He felt trapped, living in the shadows, with no real future until he met another immigrant, a business owner who took Torres under his wing and helped him sign up for community college.

This was before the DACA program, which meant he couldn't qualify for financial aid. So he paid for each class in full. He transferred to a university and obtained an IT degree. It took him about seven years to graduate, taking classes as he could afford them. When he graduated, "I never thought I could practice my profession. I was just doing it for the sake of putting the degree on the wall."

While in college he met a woman who was an IT director for a major corporation. She wanted to hire him after graduation but he wouldn't agree to an interview, not wanting to expose his illegal status. She wouldn't take no for an answer and arranged for an interview anyway.

"I was petrified. Out of the fear of being exposed about my [immigration] status, I showed up for the interview," he said. To his shock, a few weeks later, he was offered the job.

It was 2012, the DACA program had just started and he had already applied for it. On the same day he got the job offer, "I received notification that I was approved for DACA and I would receive my work permit in a couple of weeks," he said. "It changed my world overnight."

He got a driver's license, medical insurance, and paid for medical care for his family. Before that, his parents simply didn't go to the doctor when they were sick, he said.

He did well in his career, moving to various jobs until he was hired at IBM almost two years ago. His proudest achievement: saving enough money to buy a house earlier this year. "That's the American Dream," he said. 

But then the Trump administration announced the end of the DACA program. His DACA status is good through 2019, but he was turned down for a car loan, labeled as "high risk"

The idea of being forced to leave his job, house, friends that he loves is both terrifying and depressing.

"You grow up and you embrace this country. This is your community and your neighborhood and you feel like you are a part of it, right? But you feel like part of you is not wanted. And it's really difficult. It's like falling in love with the wrong person and she doesn’t love you back," he says.

Talking with lawmakers

IBM has been bringing its Dreamer employees like Torres to Washington, D.C. to meet with lawmakers so they can see the people who will be impacted by their legislation, or lack thereof. Some 800,000 people are in a similar situation in the US.

Students gather in support of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) at the University of California Irvine Student Center in Irvine, California, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Mike BlakeTorres was part of a coalition of dreamers that went to DC on Wednesday to tell his story to lawmakers.

He and other dreamers met with various lawmakers or their staff including Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), Rep. Carlos Curbelo (R-FL), Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX), and Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Rep. Diaz-Balart (R-FL), Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI), Senators Ted Cruz (R-TX), Jeff Flake (R-AZ), Thom Tillis (R-NC) and so on.

"Everyone has been really respectful," he says of the meetings.

IBM is one of a number of companies that brought Dreamers to DC on Wednesday as part of an organization called the Coalition for the American Dream that seeks to get a law passed that will allow Dreamers to stay in the US.

In the meantime, Torres is preparing for the worst. "I paid off all my debt and I'm trying to pile up money," he says. "If I have to leave I’ll move somewhere else. I hear Canada is looking for people in IT."

Still he's hopeful it won't come to that. "We are not looking for a handout, or to pay less taxes or take benefits," he says of himself and fellow Dreamers. He just wants to work hard and continue to live his good life in America. 

"I feel grateful," he says of his life.

Here's a YouTube video IBM put together about the lives of the several Dreamers the company employs.

SEE ALSO: IBM wants lawmakers to protect dreamers by the end of the year and is going all out to persuade them

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 15 things you didn't know your iPhone headphones could do


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